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Medical marijuana patients in Florida have more reason to celebrate this spring, as the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Services has finally finished putting together its list of rules for growers to obtain a license to sell edible products. The news comes on the heels of Gov. Ron DeSantis’ announcement earlier this year that smokeable cannabis would now be accessible to medical marijuana patients as well.

Progress has been swift and steady for people seeking medical cannabis treatments in the Sunshine State this year as legislators continue to open up more and more options for patients (and for new patients looking to learn more, the consultation process at Marijuana Doctor has never been easier).

According to reports from various news outlets in the state, the edibles regulations would have come sooner, but officials still had concerns over food poisoning and allergen contagion.

“That’s our concern because a lot of times the people taking the medical marijuana have compromised immune systems, so we want to especially be diligent and make sure they’re safe,” said Holly Bell, director of the cannabis program for the agriculture department.

Florida’s progress on the medical marijuana front has been beneficial for patients across the board. Moreover, it has, for the most part, put state legislators in line with voters who overwhelmingly support the use of medical cannabis in the state. Still, as some have argued, elected officials have a long way to go when it comes to making medical marijuana accessible to everyone in Florida.

A Slow-and-Steady Approach to Medical Marijuana

Unlike smokeable forms of medical marijuana, which were illegal under Florida’s law when it was first passed, cannabis edibles have always been legal. Still, the medical cannabis establishment was unable to make or sell such products until lawmakers finalized the rules, which they finally did recently.

It’s a slow-and-steady approach to cannabis reform, but one that can’t come fast enough. According to a few news outlets, the new rules set up by officials in Florida require that medical marijuana edibles follow a strict set of guidelines. Medical cannabis edibles:

  • Must be made from marijuana oil
  • Must come from a center that has a permit to operate as a food establishment
  • Must be guided by the Health Department, who will set the rules for acceptable types of edibles, along with acceptable ingredients, product color, shape, and packaging.

Once these rules are put into effect, treatment centers will be able to dispense edibles as a valid form of treatment to medical marijuana patients.

The Benefits of Medical Marijuana Edibles

Cannabis edibles offer patients a whole host of benefits as compared to other forms of the compound that may be smoked or vaped. First and foremost, it gives patients an easier path to ingestion, especially for anyone not comfortable with inhaling smoke or vape liquid. Cannabis edibles can come in a variety of foods to give users a pleasant tasting treat that helps to “wash the medicine down.”

More importantly, edible products may last longer in one’s system than other forms of cannabis. Although they may take a bit longer to take effect because they need to pass through the liver, cannabis edibles can give users a more sustained form of dosing, one that stays in the body’s system much longer.

No matter what type of medical cannabis product you may prefer, at Marijuana Doctor, we’re here to help you navigate the entire process from beginning to end. Our board-certified physicians will evaluate you to determine if you may benefit from medical marijuana.

And after you’ve received your recommendation, we’ll help you with the registration process with the Florida Department of Health as well. Best of all, our process is risk-free with a 100 percent money-back guarantee. If you don’t qualify, you don’t pay.

You can check to see if you’re eligible for a medical marijuana card in Florida, or you can schedule an appointment online with us now.

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Contact Us

If you believe that you may qualify for a Florida medical marijuana card, don’t hesitate to ask for help! Call us at (844) 442-0362 or schedule your free consultation online.

There are several different types of OCD that a person can be diagnosed with, making it difficult to treat. Depending on the symptoms, different forms of treatment will be used. One of these potential treatments is medication. Unfortunately, most medications capable of treating symptoms of OCD come along with some pretty nasty side effects. For this reason, it’s no surprise that more and more people are choosing medical marijuana for OCD, instead.

What is OCD?

OCD is an acronym that stands for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. In the United States, it affects approximately 1% of adults, or 2.2 million people. Typically the disorder presents itself in a person by the time they turn 19.

There are several different types of the disorder, however the 4 most common are:

  • Checking
  • Hoarding
  • Contamination
  • Intrusive Thoughts

General symptoms of the disorder may include:

  • Unwanted recurring thoughts or sensations
  • Uncontrollable obsession with something (for more than one hour per day)
  • Continuously struggling with ideas that force you to do something compulsively or repetitively. This may include obsessively checking things, cleaning things, or repeatedly getting the urge to wash your hands.

These symptoms usually will interfere with social interactions, work, school, everyday tasks, and other important functions.

When the patient can’t give in to, or fights against the compulsions or obsessions, distress, anxiety, depression, or tension can result. For some people, the obsessions and compulsions are so severe and uncontrollable that they are unable to pay attention or focus on anything else.

Obsessions may include:

  • Needing things to be a certain, specific way
  • Extreme aversion to dirt and contamination
  • Suicidal thoughts and tendencies
  • Unwanted, uncontrollable thoughts (religious, sexual, etc…)

Some examples of compulsions are:

  • Counting
  • Checking
  • Maintaining a specified routine
  • Washing
  • Cleaning / Organization
  • Requiring constant reassurance

With that being said, a patient won’t necessarily be both obsessive and compulsive, although that is often the case.

How is it typically treated?

Common treatments for the symptoms of OCD include cognitive behavioral therapy (cognitive therapy & exposure/response prevention,) anti-anxiety medication, antidepressants, or a combination of all these things.  

Medications can manage depression and anxiety long enough to give therapy a chance to work. While this is usually relatively effective, there is some bad news. That is, negative side effects from these medications can be moderate to severe, sometimes making the situation worse.

Potential side effects from anti-anxiety medication and antidepressants might include:

  • Agitation
  • Blurred vision
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Drowsiness
  • Headache
  • Impaired thinking
  • Insomnia
  • Memory loss
  • Nausea
  • Weight gain

Medical Marijuana for OCD

Marijuana has been utilized as a pain & anxiety-reliever for hundreds of years. Although the effectiveness of marijuana varies from person to person, one recent study concluded that a large majority of participants experienced relief from anxiety with medical marijuana. The other participants reported increased anxiety, which is due to the unique body chemistry of every individual.  

Traditional therapy (medications) boost serotonin, which is your body’s “feel good” chemical. Marijuana does not produce serotonin, but it does stimulate the release of another hormone called anandamide. Anandamide interacts with THC, causing a soothing effect, thus relieving anxiety just as effectively. Reducing anxiety helps the obsessions and compulsions dissipate.

On a side note, if a patient must continue to take anti-anxiety medications or antidepressants, CBD may be able to help alleviate some of the negative side effects.

Medical marijuana can help treat these side effects of treatment/symptoms of OCD, as well:

  • Agitation
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Impulsive behavior
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Repeated behavior and thoughts
  • Restlessness
  • Seizures
  • Social anxiety
  • Stress
  • Tension
  • Urges
  • Weight loss

If you’ve been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, you may want to consider medical marijuana for OCD. It is safer than traditional medication, and possibly more effective. It is always advised to speak to a licensed physician before switching treatments.

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Contact Us

If you believe that you may qualify for a Florida medical marijuana card, don’t hesitate to ask for help! Call us at (844) 442-0362 or schedule your free consultation online.

The US government is finally funding cannabis research! For decades, federally-funded medical marijuana research has been significantly lacking– to say the least. The fact that medical marijuana is still federally illegal, makes studying it extremely challenging. Up until now, research has primarily been focused on drug addiction studies. Clinical studies are a fundamental stepping stone to getting a substance verified as a pharmaceutical, which is why this news is so encouraging.

New Research

In December of 2018, the federal government, specifically the NCCIH (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health) shared it’s intent to study the potential pain relieving effects of “minor cannabinoids” and terpenes.

The NCCIH is one of twenty-seven institutes that make up the NIH (National Institute of Health). This agency utilizes rigorous, in-depth scientific investigation to examine the effects and safety of different health interventions.

What “Minor Cannabinoids” and Terpenes are being Studied?

We’ve all heard (and probably know quite a bit) about the cannabinoids THC and CBD. There are many others, however, that we know close to nothing about. Some of the “minor cannabinoids” of interest are: CBG (cannabigerol,) CBN (cannabinol,) and CBC (cannabichromene.)

There are several terpenes that are going to be studied as well. These include limonene, myrcene, linalool, terpinene, and more.

As you may also know, all of the different cannabinoids work together to provide different pain relieving results.

Why Pain Relief?

Marijuana has proven itself effective in treating a whole slew of ailments, so why is the NCCIH focusing on pain relief? Chronic pain affects approximately one-third of people in the United States. Treating this pain costs Americans well over $600 billion each year. Furthermore, companies suffer an estimated $300 billion dollars annually in lost productivity.

We know that THC and CBD have effective, pain-treating qualities. We also know that other cannabinoids, and even terpenes, synergistically work together to produce healing effects (especially when it comes to pain relief.)

The cost of current pain treatment and the effectiveness that marijuana seems to have, are two driving factors for why the NCCIH wants to study cannabinoids and terpenes more. Research is a necessary stepping stone to certifying marijuana as a viable treatment option.

This research into alternative pain relief could also help reduce the opioid epidemic. Researchers have determined that cannabinoids and terpenes enhance the pain-relieving effects of opioids, which means opioid users can take lower doses.

The federal government has made developing an alternative pain management strategy a priority. The NIH is especially interested in the pain-relieving, non-intoxicating properties of marijuana. Marijuana has been viewed in a negative light for far too long. The fact that the federal government is finally funding cannabis research is extremely encouraging.

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Contact Us

If you are interested in becoming a medical marijuana card holder, call us at (844) 442-0362 or schedule your free consultation online, today.

If you’ve been diagnosed with depression, your doctor has probably written you a prescription for an antidepressant. The problem is, many of these drugs can produce some seriously negative side effects. While you never want to stop using a prescribed medication without the green light from a medical professional, you may want to consider treating your depression with medical marijuana, instead.

Don’t get us wrong, antidepressants can be helpful and extremely beneficial to some. For others, however, the side effects can make symptoms (and depression) worse. In this article, we’re going to go over the benefits and side effects of commonly prescribed antidepressants and medical marijuana.

Commonly Prescribed Antidepressants

Some of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants include Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil. When you suffer from depression, you have an imbalance of chemicals in the brain. These chemicals are called neurotransmitters, and are responsible for mood and emotions. Antidepressants will get these chemicals back into a healthy balance.

Potential Side Effects

The common side effects often associated with antidepressants can include:

  • Nausea

  • Increase in Appetite

  • Weight Gain

  • Loss of Libido

  • Fatigue

  • Drowsiness

  • Insomnia

  • Dry Mouth

  • Constipation

  • Blurred Vision

  • Dizziness

  • Agitation

  • Irritability

  • Anxiety

 

Severe side effects of prescription antidepressants include:

  • Serotonin Syndrome (dangerously high levels of Serotonin in the brain.) This can result in side effects including but not limited to high fever, seizures, irregular heart beat, unconsciousness, and death.

  • Hyponatremia (dangerously low levels of sodium in the blood.) This can result in fatigue, psychosis, seizures, disorientation, agitation, coma, and death.

  • Suicidal thoughts

  • Allergic reaction

  • Mania including racing thoughts, extreme moods, impulsive behavior, sleeping disorders, grandiose thinking, and irritability.

Treating Your Depression with Medical Marijuana, Instead

How does marijuana treat depression? It’s actually extremely similar to how antidepressant medication works. Medical marijuana restores the balance of neurotransmitters in the brain, which improves mood and levels out emotions.

Potential Side Effects of Marijuana

Common side effects of Marijuana (with THC**) include:

  • Dry mouth

  • Nausea & vomiting

  • Loss of libido

  • Dry or red eyes

  • Impaired mental functioning

  • Headache

  • Dizziness

  • Numbness

**CBD, the non-psychoactive medical component of marijuana, has no known side effects.

While most people will not experience the following side effects of medical marijuana as they are extremely rare, it is important to note them as a possibility. AGAIN, all of these rare side effects are associated with THC, not CBD:

 

  • High/Low Blood pressure

  • Lung Issues (if smoked AND you suffer from a respiratory disorder)

  • Panic reactions

  • Hallucinations

  • Depression

The Comparison

While it may seem as though both of these options carry quite a few potential side effects, marijuana definitely has a leg up on the competition. First, developing serious side effects from antidepressants is way more likely than developing those associated with medical marijuana. Second, because marijuana is all-natural, you cannot overdose on it. Marijuana has never killed anyone. Antidepressants, on the other hand, can be overdosed as well as cause death.

Using the right strain and dose of marijuana will help your depression symptoms, using “too much” marijuana will result in experiencing one or more of the common side effects. When it comes down to it, medical marijuana is a much safer (and potentially more beneficial) option.

Contact Us

If you’re interested in treating your depression with medical marijuana, our licensed medical physicians can help! Call us at (844) 442-0362 or schedule your free consultation online, today.